Updates

The information posted below is to help keep you informed of any changes or events we feel would be helpful to you.  We will do our best to keep it as updated as possible.  Be sure to check back for any new information.


we are here for you



We want you to know that through all of these trying times we are still here to care for your furry family members.  We have implemented curb side service to keep you and our staff as safe as possible.  You can just call us from your car and we will come out and safely bring your pet into the hospital.  Our team will evaluate your pet and the doctor will talk with you about the best plan of action for you and your four-legged family member.  You can also call to pick up medication and food as well. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to give us a call.  We will help you in any way we can.  Please stay safe and take care of yourselves as much as possible.

Your Friends at Carver Street Animal Hospital


  Canine Influenza Virus

  • Canine Influenza Virus is spread through:
    • Close proximity to infected dogs (it is airborne and can travel up to 20 ft.; Dog parks are ideal for spreading the virus)
    • Contact with contaminated items (bowls, leashes, crates, tables, clothing, dog runs, etc.)
    • People moving between infected and uninfected dogs
    • 80% of all dogs that are exposed to the virus will contract it
    • The virus lives up to 24 hours on soft surfaces and up to 48 hours on hard surfaces.
  • Some exposed dogs will be subclinical carriers - meaning some dogs will contract and spread the virus without showing symptoms.
  • Dogs show clinical signs within 24-48 hours and can shed the virus for up to 28 days from exposure.
  • Most dogs will completely recover with proper treatment.
  • Dogs that regularly interact with dogs outside of their own family or frequent places where many dogs gather are most susceptible to exposure to Canine Influenza Virus.
Symptoms
  • Dry, hacking cough (similar to kennel cough)
  • Lack of appetite
  • Lethargy
  • Discharge from the nose or eyes
  • Fever (normal temperature is 101 - 102)
Prevention
  • The best protection is vaccination. There is now a single vaccination for both the H3N2 and H3N8 strains of the virus. The vaccination requires a booster shot two weeks after the initial vaccine. Vaccination provides the best chance of immunity within 7-14 days of booster shot.
  • Isolate sick animals and keep them isolated for up to 30 days after symptoms subside.
  • Practice good sanitation. Use a bleach and water mixture diluted to 1-part bleach x 30 parts water to disinfect common areas such as tables, bowls, leashes, crates, etc. Allow items to thoroughly air dry for a minimum of 10 minutes before exposing dogs to them.  Bleach breaks down quickly so solution should be made daily. Keep in mind that bleach becomes inactive in UV light. If mopping use two buckets so as not to cross contaminate areas
  • Wash your hands frequently, ideally between handling different dogs. At the very minimum, hand sanitizer should be used between handling dogs.
  • Use disposable gowns or wipe down clothing and shoes with a bleach solution between dogs or after leaving an area where dogs congregate.
  • Food/water bowls should be made of stainless steel instead of plastic because scratched plastic is hard to fully disinfect.
Treatment
  • Treatment of Canine Influenza Virus requires veterinary assistance. If you believe your dog may have Canine Influenza Virus, please contact your veterinarian immediately. Untreated, the illness may progress to pneumonia or other, more serious problems. H3N2 can lead to severe secondary pneumonia which can cause extremely sick dogs with potential fatalities.
  • Most dogs take 2-3 weeks to recover from the illness.
Containment
  • Any dog suspected of having Canine Influenza Virus should be immediately isolated from other dogs and should not attend dog shows, day care, grooming facilities, dog parks, or other places dogs gather. Dogs are contagious for up to 30 days once they have started showing symptoms.
  • Contact your veterinarian to let them know that your dog may be showing symptoms of Canine Influenza Virus. If your dog is going to a veterinary hospital or clinic, call ahead to let them know you have a suspected case of Canine Influenza Virus. They may ask you to follow a specific protocol before entering the clinic to minimize the spread of the disease, including waiting in your car until they are ready to examine your dog.
  • Keep sick dogs at home and isolated from other dogs and cats until you are certain the illness has run its course (typically 3-4 weeks)


Below is a website where you can sign up for email or text reminders to help you stay on top of your pets care

mypets.com


Have you ever wondered about wheelchairs for pets?
I would like you to meet Darla.....
She hurt her back several years ago, but that hasn't stopped her!
Her parents fit her for a cart and she has been on the move ever since...
So much so, that they need to replace her tires!!
Darla lives on a farm and still helps out with the horses and all the other chores.....Darla is an inspiring story.

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Weight Loss and Diet CAN Work!!!!
We want to congratulate Bella on her wonderful weight loss...

LOOK AT HER SHOWING OFF HER BIKINI!!!

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Keep up the good work Bella.... You go girl!!

Sign-up using the form or call us at 919-477-7319 to schedule your appointment today!

Office Hours

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-6:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am-12:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Find us on the map

Testimonial

Read What Our Clients Say

  • "We love Carver Street Animal Hospital! Everyone is so friendly and helpful. Dr. Gillian is wonderful, she always takes extra time to make sure all of our questions are answered. I highly recommend CSAS!"
    Heather Augustine (Facebook)

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